About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 25
CSPAN2 19
CNNW 11
MSNBCW 7
CNBC 5
FBC 4
CNN 3
KQED (PBS) 3
MSNBC 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
WUSA (CBS) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 104
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 104 (some duplicates have been removed)
around the world are concerned about it. it used to be the case that they were more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed. they often ask about it and its resolution. >> what do you think the impact could be globally? we're looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> the u.s. is about 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of the fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth, it is going to have repercussions around the world. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worried about this? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. to have that large player virtually shut in a recession would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not think that's at the moment. we do not want to have this effect on a french our recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill and to th
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
for hundreds of patients during her time with us. everyone is shocked by the loss of a much loved and a valued colleague. >> in a statement, a spokesman said the duke and duchess were deeply saddened to learn of the death of saldanha. "they were looked after so wonderfully well at all times. their thoughts and prayers are family andnha's friends." the call was made by two austrian radio presenters. they work for a sydney radio station. the station has offered its deepest sympathies. the presenters will not be returning to the station until further notice. nurse saldanha was on night duty at the hospital last monday night. the duchess of cambridge had been admitted a few hours earlier. at 5:30, the call came through. she answered it and was taken in by the callers impersonation of the queen. she put it through to a second nurse who was monitoring the duchess. according to the hospital, nurses saldanha had not been disciplined or suspended. jacintha saldanha was married with two children. >> now to the economic deadline facing the united states, which has global implications. it is a combination
of the key city aleppo. some rebels named by the u.s. state department terrorists. they designated a terrorist group linked to al qaeda in iraq. the department imposed sanctions. what does it mean to sort out good rebels from bad? nick paton walsh explains. >> reporter: not only look different, black flags, well armed and disciplined, they fight differently, too. using suicide tactics and mass casualty car bombs, radical extremists but undeniably effective. behind a stream of rebel victories, overrunning regime bases across syria, many thinking the end of assad is nearer than ever. why has the united states, who also want assad gone, black listed them as terrorists? >> we've had concerns that al nusra is little more than a front for al qaeda in iraq who has moved some of its operations into syria. >> reporter: that link clear in the document filed monday, al nusra deemed not a new group, another name for al qaeda in iraq. u.s. officials believing insurgents who kill americans in iraq fighting for rebels against assad. this move may make sense in principle but, say experts now, less
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
killed in a u.s. drone strike in the pakistani region of north waziristan. the attack targeted a home with a pair of missiles. pakistani intelligence says the victims were suspected militants. the syrian government is accusing western leaders of drumming up support for foreign military intervention by invoking a month on fears of chemical weapons. this week, president obama warned president bashar al-assad against chemical weapons, about an unspecified consequences. speaking to leaders in brussels, hillary clinton followed suit. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime may turn to chemical weapons, or may lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. so as part of the absolute unity we have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. those responsible would be held to account. >> in response to the threat, assad's regime has assisted it will not use chemical weapons against its own people, calling an assertion to the contrary to a pretext for intervention. >timothy geithner is says t
you in, harris. thank you for joining us. "america live" starts right now. >> fox news extreme weather alert on the deadly storm that has caused major problems from texas to the northeast the storm is now blamed for a total of 15 deaths. whipping up tornados in the south, strong winds and rain along the atlantic coastline and dumping heavy snow from the plains to new england. the northeast getting hammered today. some areas are seeing more than a foot of snow while others deal with a heavy wind-swept rain leading to big airport delays in ohio, more than a thousand trucks are sent out, some getting heavy police escort as winds cause zero visibility. drivers say the situation is awful. >> i have seen 10 cars in an accident. i have saw a lexus fly into a ditch. i saw a semi-truck jackknife. all kinds of stuff. >> i have lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor-trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. so i think people are just not really driving slow enough for the conditions. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents thus far in
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
to be the best solution for us, the other test is a bio markers tests and that is an indication of the effect of growth hormone on the body and since those effects of last much longer than the growth hormone is actually there the window of detection is much broader and the other two tests currently in development. >> did trials include a wide range of individuals with a wide range of body types? >> yes, it did. >> as the test gone through the peer review process and what were the results of that process? >> as i mentioned the test has had four publications related to the test itself published in the peer review literature. the bio markers test has had 33 publications weighing the background for the tests and again those are in. the literature. quite a bit of research has been done over the last 15 years. >> thank you. mr. chairman, just yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this
would continue to grow, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. and if, you know, people start seeing that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction that we could have had had the republicans been willing to take the deal that i gave them, if they say that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is going to be depressed, then, obviously, that's going to have an adverse reaction in the markets. >> what about automatic spending cuts? those take effect january 1st, as well. do they have to be part of this deal? you've got half of those cuts in defense law? >> well, congress agreed they would cut an additional $1.2 trillion in spending. they put a committee together to try to come up with those numbers. they didn't figure out how to do it. so what we now have is a situation where these automatic spending cuts go into place. now, if we have raised some revenue by the wealthy paying a little bit more, that would be sufficient to turn off what
friend from the technical world joining us moments in the second hour of "the closing bell." >>> and it is 4:00 p.m. on wall street. i'm mandy drury sitting in for maria bartiromo. this is where we're finishing the day on wall street. we're also finishing out the trading week as well. the nasdaq has been the underperformer all day because of apple. still sitting below 3,000. the dow managing to finish 80 points higher. the s&p 500 also stretching its legs, up by four points. bill, you're back. >> of course. we've just started without you here, mandy. i'm bill griffeth. let's find out who made money on wall street. i'm still getting dressed here. ralph is our mentor here. and there's our own rick santelli. so we just got started here. what do you think of this market? >> i'm ecstatic. >> you're ecstatic? >> yes. >> is that beyond bullish? >> yonbeyond bullish. if bad news can't take you down, that's good news. for the past couple weeks, that's all we've been getting. and the market is working its way higher. it's not only in the states. it's around the world whether it be ho
>>> that's it for us. >>> that's it for us. thanks for watching. "early start" begins now. >>> without warning, a surprise tornado strikes in the middle of a series of severe storms throughout the southeast. >>> plus, secret sabotage. police want to know who's behind the pipe bombs found attached to the gas tank of a large truck. >>> mum's the word on the air force's secret space plan set to blast off today. secret but we have some details. >> we know all about it. >> good that's right. good morning and welcome to "early start," everyone, i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. tuesday, december 11th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. we begin this morning in the south where more storms are expected today. this after residents are left cleaning up from the aftermath of yesterday's storms. the rain was so intense. take a look at what happened to the home of one man, this is birmingham, alabama as he was being interviewed by a local tv reporter. >> we had dogs. he was in the cage. oh, my god. oh, my god. oh, my god. you all okay? you all okay? you all all right? >> look at that,
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
>> steve: thanks very much for joining us on this thursday. tomorrow, friday, that means geraldo rivera drops by. >> gretchen: he will. and we're going to have more with the cast from "a christmas story" in our after the show show. we can hardly wait. >> brian: you just finding this out for the first time? >> steve: who needs broadway when you got fox friends friends. see you tomorrow, everybody. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these canni
is the negotiators are probably going to use a baseline that is different from the congressional budget office and senator warner talks about getting savings from the tax rates going up on what the americans. as i understand, it is already built into the cbo baseline. so, in terms of getting to that four to 6 trillion-dollar how much are we talking a lot in terms of real savings and in terms of tax increases, and how much are we talking about in terms of coming you know, just a redefined baseline? and then in the other question is can you give us an idea in terms of framework we are likely to see at the end of the year are we just going to see a bunch of top line number $800 billion with some sort of trigger or are we going to see the details, and if we see a bunch of top line numbers, how long does it take to get to feeling that an and drafting the legislation to get it through the congress? >> i would like to answer the second question. >> there is an old adage that says you don't learn a lot on the second kick in the shin from a mule. we've down this road of process. we have 12 fighting hig
with the internet to this emphasis on data and what data can tell us and the cloud has given us an enormous potential. >> completely. information technology in and of itself creates 5% or 10% of the value. connectivity is 10% of what it's about. the rest is about better decision making, better analytics, saving money. about doctors that know how to make better diagnoses. that's where the next wave is. that's where the action is. what we're saying is, look, industrial companies stay out of that at their own peril. it's no longer a day where you say "i'm going to make the engine and let a software guy decide how it flies." that's what we're focused on. >> rose: are there businesses that still now are in the part of g.e. that you want to spin off or do you have the core companies for the future? >> i think we've got the best portfolio we've had in a decade. financial services is a lot smaller than the last time i was on your show, for obvious reasons. but we're in the range of 60% to 70% of the country is industrial 30% to 40% is financial. that's a pretty good balance for us. so i'd say we're
for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the other guy. i understand this is a team sport, a competitive environment we are in, but at the end of the day, if we're not solving problems, it is pretty of the. >> -- empty. >> can you trace the trajectory of the partisanship? >> i can see it very directly going back to 1994. newt gingrich, he had a vie
. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
is affecting your trip home for the holidays. it will be a very merry christmas for the familiar leave this u.s. marine veteran just released from one of mexico's most dangerous prisons. where he stopped off before heading home causing some concern. how about this. a short-cut to becoming a doctor, a new program being offered by one of the most prestigious medical schools in our country saving both time and money for the students, but does it skimp on training, a doctor in three years? it's all happening now. but first there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poi
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
for his alleged role in the attack that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. molly is live in washington with the latest. hi, molly. >> hi, rick. he is a leader in the terror world. he is ambitious and very dangerous and now egyptian authorities aided by u.s. intelligence have him. officials have been tracking him for months according to the "wall street journal" and interest intensified after followers participated in the attack in benghazi, libya. he was captured in the past week or so, but we don't have details yet on how he was detained. u.s.ish ifs have not been able to interrogate him yet. here is what we know. ahmad is a former egyptian jihad member. he was released from a prison in march of 2011. he is the leader of the jamal network and has been setting up terror training camps in libya and egypt with some financial help from al-qaeda and yemen. and he was trying to set up al-qaeda in egypt. meanwhile secretary of state hillary clinton will be testifying on the benghazi uhing tay. a review board investigating the attack should be completed soon and s
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
a little later. there go the fireworks. yeah, it is officially new year's eve. >> 18 hours ahead of us. >> happy 2013 to those folks just a few hours away from us. good morning, everybody. i'm becky quick along with andrew ross sorkin. joe kernen is joining us from washington, d.c. this morning along with john harwood. joe, i know you have a huge lineup there. and i know you were up a little late last night, too, right? >> yes, becky, very late. you and andrew, i hope you guys are ready for the heavy lifting. can i ask you a question? are they over the cliff in new zealand, do you know? >> yeah, i guess that's it. >> the sequester would have gone into effect. >> no, that's probably only affecting us here, but that shows you how close it is. we are -- i guess something could happen at 11:00. we'll see, beck. andrew, good to see you, as well. >> good to see you. >> we've switched. i've got the jacket on, you've got the jacket off. how does that capital building look? >> it looks great behind you. you look very statesman like, absolutely. you have your rise above pin on for this final day
with them behind bars. here's what she told us inspired her decision to help these kids. >> i was starting my social work, i got a chance to visit the jail and when i visited the jail first time i felt that how fortunate i am that my parents are working so hard, just for me to get a good education. but there are some other children, just because of their parents, the children are also suffering. so i thought that i should do something. >> fantastic. one word. "cnn newsroom" continues now with the lovely and talented brooke baldwin. >> ashleigh banfield, thank you so much. i'm brooke baldwin. top of the hour, a lot of news to get to on this monday. first, of course, talks over the fiscal cliff. they are going nowhere fast. democrats, they're basically telling republicans, hey, ball's in your court. we'll take you live to the white house for that. also, as the city grieves over an nfl player's tragic breaking point, new debates today about gun control and domestic violence. you'll hear both. but first, the u.s. has long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concern
four years because helping u.s. job creators export shouldn't be a partisan issue. over 100 bilateral trade agreements are being negotiated today as we speak here on the floor. the united states is a party to none of them. we are a party to one multilateral trade agreement which i support but we need to get back engaged in bilateral agreements to open markets for our products, our service providers. we have been sittingr hands on the sidelines in an increasingly global and dynamic economy. this is the first administration actually since f.d.r. not to ask for the ability to negotiate trade agreements using expedited procedures. and this is something unique, trade promotion authority in order to negotiate agreements. this administration has yet to even ask for it over the last four years. last year we finally passed the korea, panama and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bip
we'd like to add indicate -- advocate the things that people sent us here to do. if we have something to say in an amendment, if we're in the minority, we'd like to have the chance to make that amendment. what a number of us are doing, we've been talking, is how can we do two simple things, how can we make it easier for the majority leader to get bills to the floor and how can we make it easier for the minority especially to be able to offer amendments? if we can do those o things, madam president, at the beginning of the year, i think the united states senate will begin to function much more effectively. it will be a better place to work. we'll get our job done in a better way. there will be less finger pointing and more results. there will be a change in behavior, which is what we really need instead of a change in rules. and it will inspire the confidence of the people of the united states about the kind of job we're doing. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
votes to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never doneรง in our histor until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> what does that mean to you, gov nosh, quickly? what does it mean to say, i will not play that game? does he need a signature amrooufl by congress of debt ceiling increase? >> he needs a debt ceiling increase for sure. he needs to get this done. we need to stop playing games and get the big deal done. the big deal is more than just tax rates. it's more than a lot of important things and the president has to lead on that, chris. >> thank you, governor ed rendell of pennsylvania, and alex wagner from the show "now," which is i great show -- >> 9 a.m. pacific, chris. >> what a calculation that was. >>> want to know what a real fiscal crisis looks like? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if repu
these old coots, it could be used in peace talks and could cure the common cold. unless you think i'm exaggerating, look at how the video ends. >> i have a dumb knee. and then the horse back. ride the cowboy. >> it is video prozac. you are welcome. it is too bad the house of representatives went home on break. i think that is what they need to crack the whole thing wide open. that is simpson style. >> we will see you one hour from now 10:00 p.m. eastern. piers morgan starts right now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> bob costas, did he cross the line. >> and the most outrageous royal prank over. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers more dpgan ton. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. the royal prank called heard around the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively dis
to 2030. they say the u.s. won't be the world's only superpower. the council says china will pass the u.s. economically a few years before 2030. the council's analysts say the u.s. will remain unrivaled in its ability to orchestrate all aspects of power including the military it the analysts say the japanese economy will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china w
be just the beginning of the day. wolf. >> alison on the scene for us, thank you. the president's taking a political risk by getting into michigan's union fight at the same time he's locked in a major battle in washington over raising ta spending cuts and more. let's bring in our chief white house correspondent jessica yell be. jessica, is it surprising the president decided to speak today on this right to work issue? >> reporter: wolf, the white house has come out very strongly against right to work laws. and the unions have been strong supporters of the president. but it is quite surprising the president was so forceful in his, expression of support today, after he had a more muted response during the election, after the scott walker recall effort. today, the president made his first comments on the michigan law, and it was indeed a forceful show of support for organized labor. here is the president. >> you know, these so called right to work laws, they don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right t
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
tony blair is with us. but planes from iran. revolutionary guards showing off what they are claiming to be is a captured american drone. coming up why the pentagon says don't believe it. >>> and baby makes three at buckingham palace. the royal couple, will and kate, creating a media frenzy on both sides of the pond with word that they are expecting. we're going to go live to london. >> talk about this morning, in addition to tony blair, we're talking to democratic congressman xavier becerra, republican senator ron johnson from the state of wisconsin, also pat houston, whitney houston's sister-in-law and manager and jeopardy champion ken jennings written a new book. it's tuesday, december 4th, "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome everybody, you're watching "starting point." we're honored this morning to have the former british prime minister tony blair with us as our guest. he's going to be weighing in as a number of topics. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk a
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
guest host, contributor dan greenhouse, a chief global strategist with btig. he's going to be with us throughout the program. and merry christmas. and -- >> same you to, as well, sir. and other holiday greetings. >> we don't pay you a lot for cnbc contributor, do we -- did we order you to be here? >> i'm contracturally obligated to not specify anything. >> not specify anything? here at 5:30 and all the way to 9:00. >> i knew that there would be trouble this morning. i got myself seated -- >> good. we'll squeeze you for everything you're worth. we needed a big name. >> big name. we got one. >> it day after -- for december 26. >> you're too kind. >> then here you are. >> here he is. >> what did you get? anything good? >> i have -- >> switch, lump of coal? >> he's a hanukkah guy. >> a lump of coal -- yes, but a lump of coal at some point probably worth something. tet rate we're going. >> that's right. you're -- no tree? >> i want a tree, my wife says they're too messy. >> the trees are messy. >> the needs needles -- >> you have the festivus pole. >> grievances -- >> you better go, sorry.
've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start there. >> it's like an etch-a-sketch. you shake it up and we start all over again. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romneysia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> the
question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the whole issue. [inaudible question] >> i think that is reckless talk. [inaudible question] >> listen, raising taxes on small businesses will not help our economy and will not help those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table. to take a step towards the president to try to resolve this. >> is there someone you could agree to tax rate increases and protect small businesses may be at the same time? >> there are a lot of things that are possible. the president insists on this position. insist on my way or the highway. next. connell: speaker of the house john boehner. dagen: i think ed henry says no progress and charges at the white house. connell: there is the optimism. it has been waning anyway on the stock market. the speaker talk to you about the phone call about the president needing to get more serious. we will talk more about that coming up. mark warner is supposed to join us from
to us there wasn't anything we couldn't do. there is no limits as to how far we can go. we have limits because we got here late, the language, the skills, but you can be anything you want. and i can't tell you how important that is for a young person to not only have dreams and believe those dreams are possible. if i worry about anything, i spoke about this last night, young americans aren't dreaming or aren't believing the dreams are accessible to them. >> >> you mentioned mitt romney who until three weeks ago was the leader of the party. mitt romney going to disappear or does he have a continuing role? >> i hope he doesn't disappear and hope he has a continuing role. first of all, very few people have done what he has done, run for president and be the nominee of the party. >> and get crushed. >> that's not accurate. he got 47%. he won a lot of states. he didn't lose 49-1. he won places and has a lot of supporters. but he has been successful at life. and i told him this, too. mitt romney is a role model as a person, a father, husband, community leader. he has a lot to offer the repub
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
businesses major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> can u.s. politicians reached a deal to stop tax rises in spending cuts from damaging the american and the global economy? hillary clinton is being treated at this hospital in new york. she has a blood clot. there's concern over the health of the venezuelan president who has suffered complications after cancer surgery in cuba. walk into bbc world news. coming up, and look back at the british troops as they prepared handover to afghan forces. new zealand becomes the first major city to welcome 2013. time is running out for politicians in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wa
happening in syria with the use of chemical weapons. somebody else has a threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner. you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> stretching and shooting to syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 104 (some duplicates have been removed)